E.L. Marker™ signs Margaret Bagley’s Historical Fiction

SALT LAKE CITY, UT September 21, 2017

As a little girl, Margaret Bagley watched as her father uncovered a faded blue wooden chest from a shed he was cleaning out. Years later she would discover what treasures were hidden within.

The blue chest had belonged to her grandmother, accompanying her as she crossed the plains as a pioneer. Inside, Bagley found letters exchanged between her grandparents from 1883 to 1907. As she read and organized the letters, she found pieces of a family story that left her with unanswered questions.

“They detailed teenaged angst, early courtship, marriage in 1890 and eventually disillusionment,” Bagley said. “I questioned what motivations, events and activities led to the comments and questions they exchanged.”

The storyteller in Margaret wanted the whole picture, even if she had to make it up. She filled the gaps in with her own fictionalized account of the story to weave the letters into a logical and interesting series of events. She added plot twists and fictional characters as needed, but stayed as true to historical events as possible.

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“When will you move?” / Lisa Kusel

This post was originally published as a first-person essay on parent co., May 3, 2017. It also appeared on the author’s website On Monkey Forest Road, under the title “Mother, May I?” It is used here with the author’s permission.

When my husband, Victor, was offered a teaching job at a new school in Bali, I held off sharing the news with my mother for as long as humanly possible. I knew that when I told her we were moving her Jew-ish granddaughter to a predominately Muslim country, the arrow on her paranoia meter would swiftly catapult beyond the red zone. I expected her to fret and cry and do all she could to change my mind.

What I didn’t expect, though, was that she would be so wise.

I called her on a Tuesday morning. She listened silently as I recapped the events of the last few weeks: from reading about the school in a magazine, to convincing Victor to send a resume, to his Skype interview, to him flying to Bali to check it out, to him coming back to California with a signed contract.

When I finished speaking, I tensed, waiting for the emotional storm to blow through the phone line. “When will you move?” She asked so calmly I thought perhaps I’d called someone else by mistake.

“In six weeks. We have to find renters and pack up the house and deal with the cat and get a million shots and—” I got so anxious thinking about the list that I cut myself off. “Anyway, we’re really excited. It’s going to be amazing.”

“Loy is only six years old.”

Here it comes, I thought. She’s going to let loose her worries bit by bit, like an IV drip. “So what, she’s six? She’s going to love it. I mean, come on, Mom. It’s Bali!”

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Jo Ann Simon to Partner with E.L. Marker™ to Publish her Memoir of Hope

SALT LAKE CITY, UT September 13, 2017

Jo Ann Simon has led a full and fulfilling life. But the parts that mean the most to her are the memories shared with her husband Tom. She wanted to remember every detail: from the way they met, to the love they shared as they worked and raised a family together.

Even the heartbreaking times as Lyme Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis worked its way through Tom’s body and took his life were not to be forgotten. So she began to write.

Though her initial purpose was to record as many details as she could about their lifelong love, she discovered new truths as she did.

“As I wrote our story, I did not feel alone,” Simon revealed. “I was back in our life together and felt close to him even though he was no longer on this earth. The writing helped me to move forward in my life and to realize that I could continue to live a full life again.”

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WiDo™ to Publish Karen Peterson Mosley’s Debut Historical Fiction

SALT LAKE CITY, UT September 01, 2017

When Karen Peterson Mosley read the autobiography of Marie Madelaine Cardon Guild as a teenager, she began a love affair with historical writing that would change her life.

“It was a fascinating story of challenge and triumph by a courageous pioneer,” Mosley said. “She became my hero.”

Since that reading, Mosley has devoured many other works of historical fact and fiction. She has even done plenty of writing on her own, whether it was in her journal, speeches or magazine articles. But the teenaged-reading of Guild’s autobiography always stayed with her, and she sought a way to pay homage to her long-time hero.

One pioneer story Karen Mosley encountered in her readings was “These is my Words” by Nancy Turner. Mosley was inspired by this fictionalized diary and thrilled to find that the author was in her area. Inviting Turner to speak at her book club, Mosley listened to her publication story and writing process with excitement. This was what she needed to do.

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Engineer by Day, Writer at Night, Karl Hanson to Publish His Debut Novel with WiDo™

SALT LAKE CITY, UT August 17, 2017

Ten years ago, when Karl Hanson envisioned a story about interstellar space travel, he knew it had to be plausible. As a structural engineer, science fiction carries a lot more science than fiction for Karl.

The logistics of populating a planet light years from our own was not the challenge for Karl; the real challenge was writing the story.

“The trouble is, I’m an engineer, not a writer,” Hanson explained. “I have done a lot of technical writing in my career, but the last time I did any creative writing was back in high school.”

For years he kept his stellar idea “in my back pocket” as it grew a life of its own. One day in 2015, he shared his story with his daughter, Paige, and she encouraged him to write the book.

“Without her,” Hanson said, “I would have never had the momentum to start this project.”

Hanson never liked the science fiction where the science ventured into fantasy. He only liked the “hard” science fi novels that use as much real science as possible to make the story believable.

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Brothers Isaac and Joshua Fisher Co-Author Spiritual Fantasy Series– Starring Cain

SALT LAKE CITY, UT August 10, 2017

Isaac and Joshua Fisher have lived divided lives. They battled constantly through childhood. Their time was divided between Utah and Minnesota. In Utah their mother reared them to be ministers, in Minnesota their father taught them to be creative thinkers.

In adulthood, the brothers chose different career paths, created different family lives, and even live in different parts of the country. But these brothers, as different as Cain and Abel, have redeemed their relationship, become close confidantes, and are now writing books together.

It’s no wonder the concept of redemption is the foundation of their trilogy.

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“New Winery, Old Friends, Perfect Alchemy” / Joanell Serra

Joanell Serra’s novel “The Vines We Planted” is currently in editing with WiDo Publishing, scheduled to be released in 2018. Joanell has drawn upon the Sonoma Valley region where she lives as the setting in her novel. This post about combining her feelings of the region with the fiction in her writing originally appeared on her website. We use it with permission from the author.

My husband, daughter and a few of our closest friends sink into extra deep couches at a new winery on the Sonoma Square. I am between edits on my forth-coming novel, and am determined to enjoy the novel’s setting while I wait.

Rancho Maria, on 1st Street, next to the (ever delicious) Harvest Moon Café, is a cool oasis on a hot day.

The wine maker, Sebastian, whom we’ve met on one previous visit, makes us his guests. He grabs a seat with us as he explains each healthy taste he pours. He is engaging, young, personable, and most importantly, makes darn good wine. His family owns the ranch, and Sebastian grew up around “wine people”- friends and family in the Healdsburg area.

Listening him talk about the grapes, the delicate alchemy in a red blend, the way the sun comes through a Cabernet, is a lot like poetry.  His admiration and commitment to his family comes through as he describes the ranch and it’s busy workings. This is truly a family owned winery, the type we need to support. And these wines make it very tempting.

The main character of my novel, The Vines We Planted, grew up on a similar ranch. In the novel, Uriel splits his time between the family’s two businesses – the winery and the horse stables.  Like Sebastian, Uriel is young, philosophical, and hard not to like. As the wine maker talks, I feel a strange blending of fiction and life.

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Risen by Eric Trant

Genre: Historical Supernatural Fiction
Print Price: $15.95
Paperback
Page count: 268
Dimensions: 5″x 8″
ISBN: 978-1-937178-91-8
For your Kindle

Haunted by visions of a demonic angel and sold into servitude by his father, young Alberto battles to survive the horrors of a nineteenth century Sicilian sulfur mine.

Suffering merciless brutality, Alberto must save not only himself but his deformed older brother, both pawns in their father’s mad plan to overthrow a group of wealthy landowners.

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“Preparing for a Children’s Book Event” / Scott Keen

(Scott Keen is the author of YA fantasy novels Scar of the Downers (WiDo Publishing, 2015) and Rise of the Branded (WiDo Publishing, 2017). He blogs at ScottKeenBooks.com. This post originally appeared on his website and appears here with his permission.)

Recently, I attended the “Ready Set Fun! Bookfest” hosted by the local PBS station. There were lots of children and adults, and many booths. I brought my own children, who loved the afternoon.

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​​The turnout was great and I was able to meet a number of nice people. I even sold a few books!
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​Each booth was to have games or activities that would engage children. Since my books are fantasy novels, the task of creating activities based on my books seemed daunting. What was I going to do? How would I use it as a tie-in for my novel?

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The Green Reaper: Memoirs of an Eco-Mortician by Elizabeth Fournier

Genre: Memoir
Print Price: $16.95
Paperback
Page count: 279
Dimensions: 6″x 9″
ISBN: 978-1-937178-89-5
For Your Kindle

When Elizabeth Fournier was eight, her mother and grandparents died. She spent a lot of time in funeral homes as a kid since her family were frequently found in caskets. Fournier family members didn’t have the best longevity record.

As a young girl, Elizabeth found cemeteries a place of peace and tranquility. As a teen, she’d attend funerals of people she didn’t know. Not surprisingly, she eventually headed into the local funeral home and asked for a job, any job. She landed the position of live-in night keeper, where she resided in a trailer in the far reaches of a large, hilly cemetery. She slept with a shotgun near her bed, experiencing the scariest summer of her life.

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