Brothers Isaac and Joshua Fisher Co-Author Spiritual Fantasy Series– Starring Cain

SALT LAKE CITY, UT August 10, 2017

Isaac and Joshua Fisher have lived divided lives. They battled constantly through childhood. Their time was divided between Utah and Minnesota. In Utah their mother reared them to be ministers, in Minnesota their father taught them to be creative thinkers.

In adulthood, the brothers chose different career paths, created different family lives, and even live in different parts of the country. But these brothers, as different as Cain and Abel, have redeemed their relationship, become close confidantes, and are now writing books together.

It’s no wonder the concept of redemption is the foundation of their trilogy.

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“New Winery, Old Friends, Perfect Alchemy” / Joanell Serra

Joanell Serra’s novel “The Vines We Planted” is currently in editing with WiDo Publishing, scheduled to be released in 2018. Joanell has drawn upon the Sonoma Valley region where she lives as the setting in her novel. This post about combining her feelings of the region with the fiction in her writing originally appeared on her website. We use it with permission from the author.

My husband, daughter and a few of our closest friends sink into extra deep couches at a new winery on the Sonoma Square. I am between edits on my forth-coming novel, and am determined to enjoy the novel’s setting while I wait.

Rancho Maria, on 1st Street, next to the (ever delicious) Harvest Moon Café, is a cool oasis on a hot day.

The wine maker, Sebastian, whom we’ve met on one previous visit, makes us his guests. He grabs a seat with us as he explains each healthy taste he pours. He is engaging, young, personable, and most importantly, makes darn good wine. His family owns the ranch, and Sebastian grew up around “wine people”- friends and family in the Healdsburg area.

Listening him talk about the grapes, the delicate alchemy in a red blend, the way the sun comes through a Cabernet, is a lot like poetry.  His admiration and commitment to his family comes through as he describes the ranch and it’s busy workings. This is truly a family owned winery, the type we need to support. And these wines make it very tempting.

The main character of my novel, The Vines We Planted, grew up on a similar ranch. In the novel, Uriel splits his time between the family’s two businesses – the winery and the horse stables.  Like Sebastian, Uriel is young, philosophical, and hard not to like. As the wine maker talks, I feel a strange blending of fiction and life.

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Risen by Eric Trant

Genre: Historical Supernatural Fiction
Print Price: $15.95
Paperback
Page count: 268
Dimensions: 5″x 8″
ISBN: 978-1-937178-91-8
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Haunted by visions of a demonic angel and sold into servitude by his father, young Alberto battles to survive the horrors of a nineteenth century Sicilian sulfur mine.

Suffering merciless brutality, Alberto must save not only himself but his deformed older brother, both pawns in their father’s mad plan to overthrow a group of wealthy landowners.

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“Preparing for a Children’s Book Event” / Scott Keen

(Scott Keen is the author of YA fantasy novels Scar of the Downers (WiDo Publishing, 2015) and Rise of the Branded (WiDo Publishing, 2017). He blogs at ScottKeenBooks.com. This post originally appeared on his website and appears here with his permission.)

Recently, I attended the “Ready Set Fun! Bookfest” hosted by the local PBS station. There were lots of children and adults, and many booths. I brought my own children, who loved the afternoon.

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​​The turnout was great and I was able to meet a number of nice people. I even sold a few books!
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​Each booth was to have games or activities that would engage children. Since my books are fantasy novels, the task of creating activities based on my books seemed daunting. What was I going to do? How would I use it as a tie-in for my novel?

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The Green Reaper: Memoirs of an Eco-Mortician by Elizabeth Fournier

Genre: Memoir
Print Price: $16.95
Paperback
Page count: 279
Dimensions: 6″x 9″
ISBN: 978-1-937178-89-5
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When Elizabeth Fournier was eight, her mother and grandparents died. She spent a lot of time in funeral homes as a kid since her family were frequently found in caskets. Fournier family members didn’t have the best longevity record.

As a young girl, Elizabeth found cemeteries a place of peace and tranquility. As a teen, she’d attend funerals of people she didn’t know. Not surprisingly, she eventually headed into the local funeral home and asked for a job, any job. She landed the position of live-in night keeper, where she resided in a trailer in the far reaches of a large, hilly cemetery. She slept with a shotgun near her bed, experiencing the scariest summer of her life.

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“Description in Novel-Writing– Too Much, Too Little?” / E. Rose Sabin

The following guest post is by novelist E. Rose Sabin, (Seduction of the Scepter, WiDo Publishing 2012), originally appearing on her blog at erosesabin.wordpress.com. It deals with a typical writerly issue: how much character description to include? The post is re-published here with Sabin’s permission.

Today’s blog raises a question I don’t have an answer for: How much description is too much, and how little description is too little?

When I write, I tend to be spare in regard to description. I think it’s largely due to the fact that when I read, I prefer to use my imagination to visualize a character’s appearance and dress. Also, I don’t like reading a story that pauses the action to give lengthy descriptions unless those descriptions are vital to the plot. In some stories the setting plays such a vital part that it must be described in detail. In all stories some sense of place is necessary, but the amount of description needed to provide that sense of place varies according to the type of story it is.

cover artIn my book Seduction of the Scepter, I set the novel in a fictitious country, but I located that country in our world in a specific historical time and in a specific region of the world: eastern Europe in the mid 1700s. Although using a fictitious country allowed me latitude to invent the political system and certain customs, those had to at least fit into the time period. Although I used no actual historical events or personages, I researched the styles of dress and hair, the popular foods, the music and dance, the religious and social customs of the era and drew on that research to make the story believable.

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Conversations with the Faithful: Seeking Enlightenment Over Lunch by Kerry Parry

Creative Non-Fiction
Print Price: $16.95
Paperback
Page count: 281
Dimensions: 5.5″ x 8.5″
ISBN: 978-1-937178-86-4
For your Kindle

Life without faith is a precarious way to exist. This was the position of a wannabe believer, Kerry Parry, who grew up in a family that believed religion was like sex. It was something you had to figure out on your own.

Her parents, who had left their own faiths of Mormonism and Evangelicalism, believed they were doing a favor to their children by shielding them from the trappings of religion. While skipping church had its benefits growing up, it left Kerry feeling adrift. She had no faith to hold onto during times of trouble. Even as a young girl, she envied those who were grounded within a community of believers.

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Sonoma Valley-inspired Author, Joanell Serra, Signs with E.L. Marker™ for Her Literary Novel

SALT LAKE CITY, UT May 16, 2017

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An award-winning playwright also acclaimed for her short stories, Joanell Serra has a love for writing… just not novel writing.  At least that was the case, until her characters practically begged her to bring them to life in a full length novel.

Serra says, “The characters [from my short stories] kept popping up in each other’s stories.  After one editor read my stories, she gave me the bad news: it really needed to be a novel!  I dug back in and rewrote the story, tying all the storylines together.”

As a family therapist, Joanell Serra has keen insight into the theme of identity within the family, a theme she explores in her writing.  She also draws on her love for her home region in Sonoma County, California. Serra states, “I love the interesting layers of community here, across cultures and socioeconomic divides. The landscape is so lush and stunning, it literally inspires one to create.”

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“A Year Without Facebook” / Elizabeth Maria Naranjo

The following post is by author Elizabeth Maria Naranjo (The Fourth Wall, WiDo, 2014). It originally appeared on her website, and we are reprinting it here with her permission. Although we encourage our authors to stay visible via social media if it’s what they enjoy, there are certain times and sites that can be more of a burden than a joy. Elizabeth’s blog post on quitting Facebook is timely, thoughtful and will no doubt strike a chord with many.

Last May, with a deep sense of relief, I quietly deactivated my Facebook account. Since that day one year ago, I have not logged back on. This is not a self-congratulatory post; I’m writing it because I know many people are overwhelmed with Facebook and have considered quitting it for good too, and if you’re one of them, I want to help if I can.

If you absolutely love Facebook or have never considered walking away because it’s a great way to stay connected to distant family and old friends or you need it for your job or you are too involved with groups that only operate there etc., it’s fine. You don’t need to justify that to anyone. This post isn’t for you.

If, however, you often find yourself weighing the pros and cons of the site and wondering if you could do without it because most of the time you actually hate it or you hate the way you feel about yourself and/or people you like/love when spending time on it, this post is for you.

Here’s what to expect when you break up with Facebook:

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Latina Author Linda González Chooses E.L. Marker™ to Publish Her Family Memoir

SALT LAKE CITY UT May 10, 2017

“What is the story that haunts you; that you don’t know how to tell?” This was the question presented to Linda González at a writing retreat. “My gut balked,” González recalled, “but I wrote down my father’s story of leaving one family to start another.

“While I listed other possibilities for the assignment, this story had the scent my nose wanted to follow. It held decisive truths about my current life — my wish to grow up-and-beyond my past and stop the chain reaction of secrets.”

While Linda is always writing, this assignment – this family secret – compelled her to pour her heart and soul into a new project: seek healing by telling the truth of her family in a memoir.

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